Art, Museum, South Wing Gallery, UP Vargas Museum

NAMELESS | Dave Lock

Lock_Untitled 1 (2013)

Dave Lock, Untitled 1 (2013)

Nameless
Dave Lock
Opens on May 31
3rd Floor Galleries

The UP Vargas Museum and the Center for Art, New Ventures & Sustainable Development (CANVAS.ph) invites everyone to the opening of Nameless at the 3F Galleries, on the 31st of May 2013, Friday, at 4:00 PM.

In this solo exhibition, Dave Lock illustrates verses from the 98B COLLABoratory in these works of oil on canvas – all untitled, hence: Nameless. A self-described “optimistic nihilist,” Lock’s work is permeated by his realizations of “an extreme termination to all living and non-living things,” which move from hand to brush to canvas, in fine strokes that illustrate the artist’s careful avoidance of disillusion and depression.

Without fully departing from the “nightmare-infested creatures” formed by merging portraiture with organic forms in his earlier worksNameless reveals softer edges in the blurring of boundaries between light and shadow; yet, these images retain their capacity to embed themselves in the viewer’s mind and encroach upon (and through) the imagination. As if to visualize trauma, Lock shows how even that which is without a name can leave an indelible mark.

The exhibition opens on the 31st of May, 2013 at the 3rd floor galleries. It is recommended, but not required, that guests RSVP through facebook.

For more information, please contact Vargas Museum at (+632) 928-1927 (direct line), (+632) 981-8500 loc. 4024 (UP trunkline), (+632) 928-1925 (fax) or send an e-mail to vargasmuseum@gmail.com. You may also check our website at http://vargasmuseum.upd.edu.ph or like us at www.facebook.com/vargasmuseum.upd.

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About Jorge B. Vargas Museum

It aims to preserve its collection donated by Jorge B. Vargas and conducts research, exhibitions, publications, and educational programs. The Vargas Museum and Filipiniana Research Center houses a museum, archives, and library devoted to the Philippine history, art, and culture from the late 19th century until the post-war era. Its main beneficiaries are students, faculty, researchers and scholars of the Philippines and Asia.

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