Art, Book Launch, South Wing Gallery

Pananaw 7

Pananaw 7
Launch at Cajipe Endaya Opening in Vargas Museum 23 April 2010 (Friday), 4pm

Now on its 14th year, Pananaw, Philippine Journal of Visual Arts releases its 7th volume focusing on art and its publics. The event auspiciously runs alongside the opening of New York-based artist Imelda Cajipe Endaya’s exhibition, Traces at Vargas Museum at the University of the Philippines in Diliman, Quezon City on 23 April 2010 at 4p.m. Cajipe Endaya was Pananaw’s very first volume editor when she was still serving in the National Commission for Culture and the Arts Committee on Visual Arts.

This latest volume in the bi-annual book series sees through an initiative launched in 1996 by volunteer artists, writers, and cultural workers in response to the felt need for an independently produced venue for critical discourse and documentation of current developments in Philippine contemporary visual arts from Luzon, Visayas, Mindanao, and the NCR. The series attempts to address the dearth in contextual and interdisciplinary texts that cast critical eyes on contemporary art practice keenly attuned to burning questions related to art history, the mapping and negotiating of Filipino artistic agency, and the interfaces of art and living.

With its focus on the creation and encountering of art within the public sphere, Pananaw 7 brings together a diverse mix of writing from Patrick Flores, Robert Paulino, Joselina Cruz, Radel Paredes, Kelly Ramos-Palaganas, Alice Guillermo, Tessa Guazon, Lisa Ito, Yael Buencamino, and Lourd de Veyra. It situates the various essays taking on questions of engagement, the sites and spaces permeated by art, murals, public art projects, and artists and the market, amidst collated artists’ manifestos and a two-year exhibition survey which has become a Pananaw staple over the years. Pananaw 7 also marks the series’s more decisive move toward reaching a broader set of readers online. Through http://www.pananaw.sining.net/audience-access, visitors will find audio-visual and hyperlinked access to a Pananaw-sponsored roundtable on new media practice and attendant issues. The volume, edited by Eileen Legaspi-Ramirez, also includes a forum on museum education. It is designed by musician-visual artist, Datu Arellano. As a long term project, the Pananaw series hopes to equip both key and peripheral art agents in becoming more actively informed and judicious participants in the way Philippine art is framed and received across platforms and across natural and political boundaries. In its eventual restructuring of its web presence, it aims to allow even more audiences to engage interactively and access the journal series’s content beyond the books’ static two-dimensional print pages. The Pananaw site intends to eventually allow various publics to access otherwise rare material such as artists’ videos, conversations between artists and critics, and documentation of performance art and other time-based practices.

Cajipe Endaya launches the digital book, Stitching Paint into Collage on the same afternoon as the Pananaw 7 launch and exhibit opening. Both publications will be available at a special price for guests present at Vargas Museum on April 23.

The Vargas Museum is located at Roxas Avenue, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City. For more information, please contact the Vargas Museum at numbers (+632) 928-19-27 (direct line), (+632) 981-85-00 ext. 4024, or send an e-mail to vargasmuseum@gmail.com for more information. Please visit the official website at http://www.vargasmuseum.org.

You may also contact the Pananaw vol. 7 editor, Eileen Legaspi-Ramirez via mobile at +639189120956 or send an e-mail to pananawngsiningbayan@gmail.com.

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About Jorge B. Vargas Museum

It aims to preserve its collection donated by Jorge B. Vargas and conducts research, exhibitions, publications, and educational programs. The Vargas Museum and Filipiniana Research Center houses a museum, archives, and library devoted to the Philippine history, art, and culture from the late 19th century until the post-war era. Its main beneficiaries are students, faculty, researchers and scholars of the Philippines and Asia.

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